Tim Kinane

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Posts Tagged "SBA PPP"

Tuesday, June 9th, 2020

SBA PPP How to Maximize and Beyond

I was a guest speaker on the inaugural Small Talk online series for the Business Development Board on Martin county.  The interview is from late April and the key points remain valid as businesses transition back to a healthier economy.

The topic was How to Maximize Your Loan Funds.  Along with reviewing how to best use SBA PPP funds, we discussed what to consider moving forward.

 

 

Key take away points:

SBA PPP Funds:

Keep communication open with banker and CPA.

  • Be proactive
  • Review options
  • Ask questions
  • Document expenditures
  • Consider immediate and longer-term cash needs
  • Multiple cash flows

 

Keep communication open with vendors:

  • Terms
  • Vendors are partners- you want them to be there to get you back on track

 

Businesses are resilient.

Generally, businesses need to find a way to react quickly to an issue or problem.

  • How much money is needed
  • What is the best way to spend money now
  • How to make the next immediate decision

That is great during the time of crisis, but it is important to think future down the line.

Employees

They are the one who helped to build your business to where it is now, they will be vital  to re-build your business.

Keep in contact- keep communication open.

 

Opportunities in times like these

Resilience of people in general, Americans and Small Business

Small Business is the engine that runs this country- Small Business is what will bring the economy back.

  • Step back from the problem
  • Explore all new opportunities as you move forward
  • Challenge employees and help them find opportunities

Contact Tim 772-221-4499, to discuss strategies for your business.

Monday, June 8th, 2020

PPP Loan Forgiveness Just Got Easier

By: Patrick Ungashick

Sick Dollar

 

To help our clients and other business owners and leaders respond to the unprecedented leadership disruptions caused by the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak, the team at NAVIX offers the following crisis management information series.

Responding to Coronavirus: PPP Loan Forgiveness Just Got Easier

On June 5th, the new Payroll Protection Plan Flexibility Act (PPPFA) was signed into law, with the purpose of making it easier for companies with PPP loans to secure loan forgiveness. The new law was passed in response to widespread confusion and criticism surrounding the rules pertaining to loan forgiveness. The new PPPFA law is intended to provide greater flexibility to the loan forgiveness process, in order to help the millions of businesses and their owners survive the economic challenges created by the virus.

The important PPP loan forgiveness changes are:

1. More Time to Spend the PPP Loan Proceeds

The most significant change is that companies now have more time to spend the loan proceeds. Before the new PPPFA law, borrowers had only eight weeks (called the “covered period”) starting upon receipt of the loan to spend the funds. That pressured many companies to spend PPP funds more quickly than would best help them through the coronavirus crisis. Now, borrowers have until the earlier of either: (1) 24 weeks from the loan origination date, or (2) December 31, 2020, to spend PPP funds.

However, under the 24-week covered period, companies will have to maintain the number of FTE employees for about three times longer (24 weeks instead of eight weeks) to maximize loan forgiveness. To help employers address this, borrowers who received PPP funds before June 5th (when PPPFA was signed into law) can opt to remain with an eight-week covered period, if advantageous.

2. More Flexibility for How PPP Proceeds are Spent

The next important change is that the new PPPFA law reduces the amount that companies must spend on payroll costs to qualify for loan forgiveness. Previously, PPP borrowers had to spend at least 75% of the loan proceeds on eligible payroll costs. Under the new law, companies must spend at least 60%. This means that forgivable non-payroll expenses can now be up to 40% of spending, increasing from 25%. 

PPPFA also clarifies if borrowers are required to spend a minimum amount of loan proceeds. The new law clearly states that in order to be eligible for any forgiveness, a borrower must spend at least 60% of its total PPP loan proceeds towards payroll costs as defined under the CARES Act. Meaning, a borrower is not eligible for any loan forgiveness if it spends less than 60% of its total PPP loan amount.

3. More Time to Pay Back the PPP Loan

Another critical change is that borrowers now have five years, an increase from two years, to repay the PPP loan. The loan interest rate remains unchanged at 1.0%. 

4. Extended Safe Harbor to Preserve PPP Loan Forgiveness

The new PPPFA law expands the opportunities for employers who experience a reduction in employee headcount or wages/salaries to maximize loan forgiveness through several means:

  • Initially, PPP provided a “safe harbor” which permitted employers to avoid a reduction in loan forgiveness due to a significant decrease in employment and/or wage levels between February 15 and April 26, 2020, as long as the numbers of employees and employee wage levels are restored by June 30, 2020. The PPPFA extends this safe harbor restoration deadline from June 30 to December 31, 2020, giving employers six additional months to preserve loan forgiveness. 
  • PPPFA clarifies that loan forgiveness will not be reduced based on an inability to rehire employees if the borrower can document (1) written offers to rehire individuals who were employees of the organization on February 15, 2020; or (2) an inability to hire qualified employees for unfilled positions by December 31, 2020.
  • Loan forgiveness will not be reduced for borrowers who are able to document a failure to return to the level of business activity as existed prior to February 15, 2020, due to compliance with coronavirus-related guidance for sanitation, social distancing, or safety requirements from the Health and Human Services (HHS), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), or the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) between March 1 and December 31, 2020.

5. Potential Longer Deferment of Loan Repayment

Additionally, PPPFA extends the loan deferment period for many borrowers. Under the previous rules, borrowers could defer loan interest and principal payments for six months (although interest does accrue during the deferment). Now, borrowers can defer payments until the SBA determines the loan amount forgiven for that borrower. Given the new 24-week covered period, and given that lenders have 60 days to act and the SBA has 90 days to determine loan forgiveness, this could significantly increase the deferment period for many companies. However, PPP borrowers cannot just stall filing their loan forgiveness application in order to extend the deferral period. If a PPP borrower fails to apply for forgiveness within ten months after the PPP loan forgiveness covered period (which is now the earlier of 24 weeks from origination or December 31, 2020), the deferment period ends, and the borrower must begin making loan repayments.

6. Payroll Tax Deferral Expanded

Previously, companies that secured PPP loan forgiveness could not defer their employer share of payroll taxes. The new PPPFA law now allows all borrowers that receive loan forgiveness to defer payment of employer payroll taxes under Section 2302 of the CARES Act. (The payroll taxes typically due between now and through December 31, 2020, may be deferred with 50% payable by December 31, 2021, and the other 50% payable by December 31, 2022. Similarly, a self-employed taxpayer can defer paying 50% of his or her self-employment tax that would be due from now through the end of 2020 until the end of 2021 [25%] and 2022 [25%].)

However, keep in mind that this payroll tax deferral is different from the CARES Act employee retention tax credit. The PPP and the employee retention credit are still mutually exclusive, and companies may not apply for one if they use the other.

PPP Loan Forgiveness Application

To secure loan forgiveness, borrowers must complete and submit to their PPP lender the Small Business Administration (SBA) loan forgiveness application. Borrowers should carefully review the 11-page application, and consider the various definitions and options under the loan forgiveness process. Business owners are encouraged to consult their tax and banking advisors. 

The NAVIX team has helped hundreds of business owners prepare for exit. We have also helped countless owners and leaders deal with recessions, liquidity crises, and economic upheaval. Our experience and perspective enable us to guide our clients through difficult times, such as these.

Contact Tim 772-221-4499, to discuss strategies for your business.

Tuesday, May 5th, 2020

PPP: Loan Forgiveness, Taxation, and Pitfalls

By: Patrick Ungashick

Sick Dollar

To help our clients and other business owners and leaders respond to the unprecedented leadership disruptions caused by the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak, the team at NAVIX offers the following crisis management information series.

Responding to Coronavirus: PPP: Loan Forgiveness, Taxation, and Pitfalls

The Payroll Protection Program (PPP) forgivable loan program, after a rocky rollout, has entered a new reality-check phase. Some of the heralded program benefits seem to be fading away, and new risks for borrowers are emerging. Here’s what business owners and leaders need to know.

Loan Forgiveness and PPP Taxation

Last week, the IRS released Notice 2020-032 regarding the deductibility of expenses that are paid with PPP loan proceeds. The bottom line is that normally deductible expenses paid with PPP funds are likely not deductible. The reasoning is that if the loan is forgiven, and the borrowing business gets to deduct the expenses it paid with the PPP funds, that creates a “double benefit” for the borrowing company. 

Not everybody agrees with the IRS’s interpretation of this crucial component of the CARES Act. The AICPA is fighting it. Chris Hesse, CPA, chair of the AICPA Tax Executive Committee, said: “In effect, the IRS guidance means that the taxability provision [Section 1106(i)] has no meaning. Why waste the ink to say that for purposes of the Code, the loan forgiveness is not includible in income, if the government will just take away deductions in the same amount?”[1]

So, unless Congress intervenes and overrides the IRS, it seems that the much-proclaimed tax benefits of the PPP program have been largely taken off the table. 

Retroactive Guidance – Good Faith Certification of Need

As part of the PPP application, borrowers have been required to certify in good faith that “current economic uncertainty makes this loan request necessary to support the ongoing operations of the Applicant.” Neither the CARES Act nor the Treasury Department and Small Business Administration (SBA) offered any clarifying guidance on this provision. Rather, many congressional and governmental leaders initially urged business owners and executives to rush to apply, given the finite amount of loan proceeds available. 

Now, it appears the government has done an about-face. The Treasury Department’s latest guidelines retroactively instruct all PPP borrowers to make sure they can demonstrate a “need” for the funds, and also show that other sources of liquidity were not sufficiently available to that borrower. This standard did not exist when the PPP was first rolled out. 

Consequently, borrowers who received PPP loans must decide whether or not to keep the funds. Borrowers have until May 7th to repay the funds back to the SBA under a “Limited Safe Harbor” if they deem they cannot demonstrate that their need exists. 

Audit Risk

Finally, US Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin announced that any company which received $2 million or more in PPP funds will receive a full audit on the loan and how it was used. The announcement comes on the heels of several higher-profile companies that secured millions, and in some cases, tens of millions, in PPP funds. Secretary Mnuchin also reminded borrowers that they could face criminal liability if the Treasure Department determines that the borrower cannot demonstrate the economic need for the funds at the time of the application. 

And More Unanswered Questions

On top of these developments, many borrowers still have unanswered PPP questions such as eligible uses for the funds, how loan forgiveness is calculated, how to rehire furloughed employees, and others. PPP came into being in a cloud of confusion. While some questions have been answered, business owners and leaders now face a new round of uncertainty and frustration. 

Conclusion

At this point, PPP borrowers must consult with their lenders and tax and legal advisors to discuss their specific situation and questions—ideally prior to the expiration of the May 7th Limited Safe Harbor if there is any doubt about the wisdom of keeping the PPP funds. 

The NAVIX team has helped hundreds of business owners prepare for exit. We have also helped countless owners and leaders deal with recessions, liquidity crises, and economic upheaval. Our experience and perspective enable us to guide our clients through difficult times, such as these.

 

Contact Tim 772-221-4499, to discuss strategies for your business.

Friday, April 24th, 2020

PPP Funds Replenished – What You Need to Know

By: Patrick Ungashick

Sick Dollar

To help our clients and other business owners and leaders respond to the unprecedented leadership disruptions caused by the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak, the team at NAVIX offers the following crisis management information series.

Responding to Coronavirus: PPP Funds Replenished – What You Need to Know

April 24, 2020 @ 12:00 PM

US federal lawmakers today passed legislation that replenishes the Payroll Protection Program (PPP) forgivable loan program, adding another $310 billion to the forgivable loan program created by the CARES Act in response to the coronavirus crisis. The first found of PPP funding, some $349 billion, was exhausted in 14 days as about 1.6 million US businesses rushed to secure a PPP loan.

Today’s legislation also restocks the SBA Economic Income Disaster Loan (EIDL) programs, adding $10 billion to the emergency grant program and $50 billion for disaster recovery loans. Both of those lending programs were fully exhausted, as US companies seek relief to help deal with the unprecedented challenges presented by the COVID-19 crisis.

If your company did not secure a PPP loan during the first round of funding, consider contacting your SBA-approved bank or other lending organization and completing an application as quickly as possible. Demand for the second round of funding is expected to be even greater than the first round.

If you did successfully complete a PPP loan and either have received your funds or are waiting for the funds to be released, be sure to study carefully the guidelines on the proper use of the funds and how to maximize loan forgiveness.

The following free resources can assist you with PPP and other relief programs available through the CARES Act:

The NAVIX team has helped hundreds of business owners prepare for exit. We have also helped countless owners and leaders deal with recessions, liquidity crises, and economic upheaval. Our experience and perspective enable us to guide our clients through difficult times, such as these.

 

Contact Tim 772-221-4499, to discuss strategies for your business.

 

Friday, April 10th, 2020

How to Maximize Your PPP Funds

By: Patrick Ungashick

Sick Dollar

To help our clients and other business owners and leaders respond to the unprecedented leadership disruptions caused by the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak, the team at NAVIX offers the following crisis management information series.

Responding to Coronavirus: How to Maximize Your PPP Funds

Despite widespread stories of a chaotic rollout of the CARES Act Payroll Protection Program (PPP), some of the first companies to apply have received their funds. With millions of eligible companies expected to apply for this forgivable loan program, it will be important to properly utilize any funds your company receives from PPP.

Review the following steps and tactics to comply with the program, maximize the loan forgiveness amount, and provide the greatest benefit to your company. (Note: The US Treasury Department changed several important provisions of PPP while the program was being rolled out, so it is possible that some of the information provided here may change, or that additional guidance may be provided. Business owners must consult their tax, legal, and exit advisors to discuss how this program applies to your specific situation.)

1.Have a plan for how your company intends to use the funds prior to actually receiving them. Once your company receives the funds, an 8-week clock starts ticking. What your company does during this 8-week period determines the loan forgiveness, so it is best to be prepared before the funds are received.

2.Be prepared to carefully document during the 8-week period the company expenses that qualify for loan forgiveness. Your lender will require that documentation to apply for loan forgiveness on your behalf.

3.Create a balance sheet account to keep track of the PPP loan and funds. 

4.Deposit the PPP funds into a dedicated bank account. Document as you draw down the funds for eligible expenses to help create a clean audit trail.

5.Carefully monitor how the funds are used, consistent with your plan. To qualify for loan forgiveness, you must use at least 75% of the funds for payroll costs, as defined by the CARES Act. That means you can use up to 25% of the funds for eligible non-payroll costs, which are: rent, interest payments on mortgages, interest on pre-existing loans, and utilities. (Note: For purposes of determining the percentage of use of proceeds for payroll costs, the amount of any Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) refinanced will be included.)

6.Loan forgiveness may be reduced if either of the following occurs:
      a)Employees who made less than $100,000 of compensation in 2019 have their compensation reduced by 25% or more; OR

        b)The number of full-time employee equivalents is less than the same number of employees during; either February 15, 2019, through June 30, 2019; OR January 1, 2020, through February 29, 2020—you choose the more favorable period to apply.

(Two important notes here. First, it is unclear at this time exactly how loan forgiveness will be reduced, and we expect further guidance providing some sliding scale. Second, if employee terminations have already occurred, you can hire employees back by June 30, 2020, to still qualify for loan forgiveness.)

7.Avoid utilizing other CARES Act relief programs that nullify participating in PPP, including:
         a)The Employee Retention Credit

          b)Deferral of Payroll Taxes

8.During the 8-week period that starts immediately after receiving PPP funds, maximize the payment of expenses that qualify for loan forgiveness, for example:
          a)Time payroll where possible to maximize payments during the 8-week period

          b)Consider paying bonuses to employees who have demonstrated superior job performance during the crisis (remember compensation above $100,000 does not count toward loan forgiveness)

          c)Make catch-up payroll payments to any employees whose compensation was reduced as a result of the COVID-19 crisis

         d)Make additional or early payments on rent, mortgage interest, or utilities (up to the 25% threshold)

9.Remember that any amount of the PPP funds not forgiven must be repaid within two years, but loan repayment may be deferred for up to six months. 

10.There is no penalty for early repayment, but do not rush to repay any loan balance that is not forgiven. Make sure your company’s cash position remains strong until the business crisis has clearly subsided. 

11.Avoid any misuse of the funds. Business owners using the funds for fraudulent purposes are subject to criminal charges.

For additional information, download our free C.A.R.E.S. Act Executive Summary, which contains actionable information on the PPP and ten additional major tax, stimulus, and business programs created in response to the COVID-19 public health and economic crisis.

Download Summary

The NAVIX team has helped hundreds of business owners prepare for exit. We have also helped countless owners and leaders deal with recessions, liquidity crises, and economic upheaval. Our experience and perspective enable us to guide our clients through difficult times, such as these.
Contact Tim 772-221-4499, to discuss strategies for your business.